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Book: Poetry: catechism: alternative questions, spiritual catechism: inner mystery: poem

A book excerpt from the spiritandflesh.com religion and spirituality online library.

 

             

 

catechism

  

A person, deciding on which brand of soap to buy, imagines it is their choice to be clean- so why, then, are they dirty? If you are a lion-tamer, why then are you locked in a small cage surrounded by uncaged lions? How long will a person hide from a frightening beast which has not yet hurt them? How long will they hide from one that has? If the plane is going down, why polish the windows? Is it better to be under house-arrest, or to be locked out? Is it safer to be a weak man behind a bolted door, or a strong man exposed in an opening? You can tame a wild beast, but can you untame a domestic one? Is there a term for fear of oneself? And is this term ...fear? Do we simply beseech a greater intensity of the incomprehensible lives we continue to obliviously lead? Are we merely the terror of an ephemeral remembrance; a dream waiting to be forgotten? In ecclesiastic winter, how shall we judge a tree by its fruit? What if acknowledging our debilitating limitations is the thankless pinnacle of our inadequate beings? Is this the zenith required for adherence to a doctrine concerning the inevitability of itself? If we find within ourselves the prolonged adoration of whatever mystery prompted our becoming, will that adoration, then, be suspect as the original intent of the prompter? Could we paint round rocks into soccer balls and, leaving them on a field, define transgression as the moment just preceding folly: the first presumptive kick? Are we simply the angst of ancient windows, forced to view recurrent folly with tedious disgust? Is this atmosphere of dread and boredom merely the concomitant fallout of an evolution overtly impatient with itself?  And are we at the final stage of our apocalyptic lives, where we can abdicate our will, but not our suffering?

 

 

(excerpted from THE DREAM OF BEING: aphorisms, ideograms, and aislings, by Jack Haas)

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Books by Jack Haas. Autobiography, Memoir, Spirituality, Mysticism, Comparative Religion, Poetry, Art, Photography.